• A Few of Our Favorite Things

    Sometimes, as we’re researching a specific blog topic, or finding materials for a patron, we stumble across materials that aren’t relevant to our particular search. Today, we’d like to share some of those items with you, items that make us smile and that brighten our ... more

  • Mrs. Narcissa (Newkirk) Douglas: Wooster Woman of Many Attainments

    All too often, women get lost in history. When they are young and still living with parents, they may fall in the shadow of their father or grandfather. Once they marry, they fall into the shadow of their husband. Such is the story of Mrs. Narcissa (Newkirk) Douglas. Narcissa Newkirk ... more

  • Military Pioneers: Women’s Auxiliaries and World War II

    Seventy-five years ago this month, Congress passed legislation establishing the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC). The WAAC was one of several military and civilian women’s auxiliaries that made an important contribution to the war and helped lay the groundwork for future ... more

  • “The Greatest, Gentlest, and Most Famous and Heroic Beast That Ever Lived”

    Have you heard the news? This month will mark the final performances of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, which has been in operation in various forms for nearly 150 years. The rise of the circus began in the mid-1800s, but over the last century and a half, ... more

  • “Arbor Day Proposes for the Future”

    Today marks the annual observance of Arbor Day in Ohio, a yearly holiday meant to celebrate trees and their importance to our lives and environment. Arbor Day celebrations usually involve tree planting ceremonies, both large and small, a number of which can be found on Ohio Memory! Seen ... more

  • Tender Remembrance: The Art of Victorian Hairwork

    Near the end of the 19th century, a female member of the Loffer family of Degraff, Ohio, crafted a family heirloom, a piece of art that memorialized those loved ones who had died. It included representations of each family member, with space in the center to focus on whoever had ... more

  • The Law of the Land: William Howard Taft

    This week we conclude our series on chief justices from Ohio with William Howard Taft, the only person to serve as both U.S. president and chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Taft was born in Cincinnati in 1857. His father was a judge who served as secretary of war ... more

  • “Born in England, Raised in Cleveland and Schooled in Vaudeville”

    Leslie Townes Hope was born on May 29, 1903, in the London suburb of Eltham, England, to his mother Avis and his father William, a stonemason. These days, Leslie (who later changed his name to Lester) is better known to millions as the world-famous entertainer, Bob Hope. When Hope was ... more

  • Vibrancy in Nature: Papillons and the Art of E.A. Séguy

    By the time March rolls around, Ohioans are usually ready for warmer weather. Indeed, though this past winter was largely uneventful and mild, warmer spring temperatures are a welcome relief. Still, despite spring having officially sprung on March 20, we still have a bit of time until the ... more

  • The First Lady of American Cinema

    In honor of Women’s History Month, today’s post features Lillian Diana Gish, a native Ohioan whose career as an actress, director and writer spanned most of the 20th century, from around 1899 through 1987. She was born in Springfield, Ohio, on October 14, 1893, to Mary ... more